Castle Provincial Park & Castle Wildland Provincial Park

Castle Provincial Park and Castle Wildland Provincial Parks offer front-country, back-country and wilderness experiences across 105,500 hectares. Alberta's Castle Parks protect diverse habitat and major wildlife movement corridors for wide-ranging species such as grizzly bears and westslope cutthroat trout.

As of February 2017, the Government of Alberta officially established the Castle Provincial Park, and the expansion of the Castle Wildland Provincial Park. The establishment of these areas under Parks’ legislation protects important fish and wildlife habitats, shared international wildlife populations and provides headwater protection. In addition, significant recreation and tourism potential of the area will be enhanced, contribute to the local economy, improve the quality of life of Albertans and continue to position Alberta as an international tourism destination.

Conservation of nature will be the primary objective of both parks. Biodiversity conservation, protection of headwaters and species at risk, and ecological connectivity will underscore management decisions. Indigenous Peoples’ rights, cultural values and traditional uses are of critical importance.

Location

Collapse
Nearby
Latitude: 49.366638 Longitude: -114.307335 Elevation: 4754 ft
the best travel advice comes from the people who live here
Sheena Pate

Downloads

Highlights of this State or Provincial Park

The Castle Provincial Park is approximately 25,500 hectares in size, and includes the previous Lynx Creek Provincial Recreation Area (PRA), Castle Falls PRA, Castle River Bridge PRA, Syncline PRA and Beaver Mines PRA. The Provincial Park offers a wide range opportunities to reconnect with nature through leisure, learning and recreation. Facilities and infrastructure support a front-country experience.

The Castle Wildland Provincial Park is approximately 80,000 hectares in size, and includes the most critical and sensitive areas for headwaters and wildlife, including major wildlife movement corridors for wide-ranging species such as grizzly bear, and habitat for threatened species such as westslope cutthroat trout. The Wildland Provincial Park provides for back-country and wilderness experiences where facilities will be limited to trails and back-country campsites that minimize visitor impacts. There will be limited built infrastructure.

Driving Directions to Key Access Points

Pincher Creek to Castle Provincial Park:

West of Pincher Creek on Hwy 507,  southwest on Hwy 774 or follow Hwy 3 west of Pincher Creek to Hwy 507 then to Hwy 774

Crowsnest Pass to Castle Wildland Provincial Park- Carbondale River: 

From Main Street in the Crowsnest Pass community of Blairmore, follow 133 Avenue across the railway tracks (GPS N49 36.438 W114 26.000) and continue to 131 Street. Turn west and follow the sharpish uphill bend to the end of asphalt and the start of Sartoris Road (GPS N49 36.225 W114 26.237).

From here on, the road is surfaced with gravel, not always well-graded. Continue south along Sartoris Road to its end at a T-intersection with Township Road 61A (GPS N49 27.252 W114 24.559). From there, you may follow the gravelled road east to its junction with Highway 507 (GPS N49 30.583 W114 12.115).

Leave a Comment

Submit